Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering

ESE319: Fundamentals of Solid-State Circuits Fall 2014

Professor Kenneth R. Laker


Do not print copies of this material on the CETS or Detkin Lab lab printers.

 


General


Syllabus
Class Notes
Lab Handouts


Policies
Lab Report Guidelines

including sample lab report


Homework Assignments
Homework Solutions


Links
Detkin Lab


Exams


MultiSim
SciLab
Matlab

 

 


Description

The course addresses the analysis and design of active circuits involving semiconductor devices including diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors.  Single-stage, differential, multi-stage and operational amplifiers will be discussed, including their high frequency response.  Oscillators, wave shaping circuits, filters, feedback, stability and power amplifiers will be covered.  A weekly three-hour lab will illustrate the concepts and circuits discussed in class.  ESE 319 is 1.5 CU.

Course Outcomes

·       Theory and Analysis

o      Demonstrate principles of component-insensitive design of semiconductor systems. (a1)

o      Demonstrate understanding principles of differential amplifier analysis. (a2)

o      Apply High frequency models of BJT circuits to determine the gain, frequency response and bandwidth of BJT amplifiers. (a3)

o      Use concepts of feedback and stability to determine gain and phase margins for a feedback amplifier. (a4)

o      Demonstrate understanding of the principles of Class A, B, and AB power amplifiers; and their application to amplifier circuits. (a5)

·       Design and Conduct Experiments

o      Design an experiment to test an electronic system, make appropriate measurements and interpret the results. (b1)

·       Design and Practice

o      Design, simulate, construct and test of semiconductor systems covered in class to relevant specs. (c1)

o      Design a basic operational amplifier circuit to specifications. (c2)

o      Demonstrate awareness of the causes of discrepancies between theoretical and practical circuit performance, and learn when these discrepancy causes are significant and when they are not. (c3)

             ·       Ability to Communicate Effectively

o      Demonstrate ability to prepare a technical report relating their lab experiment and the experimental results, including a discussion comparing experimental measurements with theory and simulation. (g1)

·       Use of Computer Tools

o      Apply circuit CAD tools used to each of the design tasks in Outcomes c1, c2 & c3 above. (k1)


* Note: a, c, g and k refer to the Student Outcomes of the EE Program.

 


General Information

Instructor

Kenneth R. Laker
Room 203 Moore
Phone: 215-898-5340
Email: laker@seas.upenn.edu

Teaching Assistant 

TA: Matt Hongjie Zhu
Room: 307 Moore
Email: honzhu@seas.upenn.edu

Time and Location

CLASS: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 11:00 AM - 12:00 N, Room 307 Towne
LAB: Friday, 1:00 - 4:00 PM, Detkin Lab

Office Hours

Prof. K. Laker: Mondays and Wednsdays 4:00 to 5:00 PM and Thursdays 8:00 to 9:00 AM and 3:00 to 4:00 PM or by appointment, room 203 Moore.

Matt Hongjie Zhu: Tuesdays 1:00 to 3:00 PM, and Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:00 PM or by appointment, room 307 Moore.

Prerequisite

ESE 216.

Main texts

_       _      ·       Microelectronic Circuits, 6th Edition, By A. Sedra and K. Smith, Oxford University Press.

_       Please click the above text title to check out the website developed to support the text.

_       _      ·       NI Multisim is installed on all Detkin Lab PCs (Student Edition is available).

Reference texts

_       ·       Microelectronic Circuit Design, 3rd Edition, By R. C. Jaeger and T. N. Blalock, McGraw Hill, 2008.

_       ·       Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, 4th Edition, P. R. Gray, P. J. Hurst, S. H. Lewis and R. G. Meyer, John Wiley And Sons, 2001.

_       ·       Fundamentals of Microelectronics, 1st Edition, B. Razavi, John Wiley and Sons, 2008.

_       ·       Nanometer CMOS ICs: From Basics to ASICs, 1st Edition, H. Veendrick, Springer, 2008.


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2014 Syllabus

 

DATE

LECTURE

SEDRA & SMITH 6th EDITION

LAB

Aug. 27

Course Introduction

ESE 319 course web site

 

Aug. 29

BJT Introduction

Sections 6.1 and 6.2; pp 351 - 371

No Lab This Week

Sep. 01

LABOR DAY

No Class

 

Sep. 03

BJT Introduction cont.

Sections 6.1 and 6.2; pp 351 - 371

 

Sep. 05

BJT Introduction cont.

Sections 6.1 and 6.2; pp 351 - 371

No Lab This Week

Sep. 08

Early Effect, BJT Biasing

Sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4; pp 371 - 373, pp 378 - 403

 

Sep. 10

Stable BJT Biasing

Section 6.4 and 6.7; pp 378 - 403, 446 - 453Section 6.5; pp 403 - 423

 

Sep. 12

BJT Small Signal Models

Section 6.5; pp 403 - 423

Basic BJT Biasing & Parasitic Elements    R’s, L’s & C’s in Detkin Lab

Additional Reading

Sep. 15

CE Amplifier and Comparison with CS Amplifier

Section 6.6 and 9.1; pp 427 - 435, pp 694 - 700

 

Sep. 17

CE Design & Current Mirror Design

Sections 6.8, 7.4 and 9.1; 452 - 458, pp 532 - 537,

pp 694 - 700

 

Sep. 19

CB & CC Designs and Comparisons with CG & CD Amplifiers

Section 6.6 and 6.8; pp 436 - 446, pp 459 - 461

No Lab this week

Sep. 22

HF Models & MOS vs. Bipolar & Cascode Amplifier(To Be Updated)

Sections Appendix F, 9.2 and 9.4; on DVD, pp 706 - 711, pp 721 - 727

Sep. 24

HF Models & MOS vs. Bipolar & Cascode Amplifier (To Be Updated)

Section 9.4 and 7.3; pp 727 - 730, pp 520 - 523

 

Sep. 26

CD Mode & Differential Amplifier (To Be Updated)

Section 8.3; pp 587 - 588, pp 612 - 615, pp 618 - 628

Bipolar Amplifier

NEW

Sep. 29

CD Mode & Differential Amplifier (To Be Updated)

Section 8.3; pp 587 - 588, pp 612 - 615, pp 618 - 628

 

Oct. 01

Differential Amplifier Cont. (To Be Updated)

Section 8.3; pp 587 - 588, pp 612 - 615, pp 618 - 628

 

Oct. 03

Differential Amplifier Design (To Be Updated)

Class Notes

BJT Current Mirror Bias

CA3046

NEW

Oct. 06

Differential Amplifier Design Cont. (To Be Updated)

Class Notes

 

Oct. 08

Differential Amplifier Design Cont. (To Be Updated)

Class Notes

 

Oct. 10

FALL BREAK

No Class Oct. 11 and No Labs Oct. 11 & 12

No Lab this week

Oct. 13

Differential Amplifier Offset

Section 8.4; pp 632 - 635

 

Oct. 15

MID-TERM EXAM 1 (TENTATIVE)

1) MT1 Practice Problems NEW

Exam coverage: all class and text materials from start of class through HF model and its use.

Oct. 17

Differential Amplifier Offset Cont.

Section 8.4; pp 632 - 635 and Class Notes

HF Amplifier (week 1

Oct. 20

Differential Amplifier with Active Load

Section 8.5, pp 644 - 650

 

Oct. 22

Differential Amplifier with Active Load Cont.

Section 8.5; pp 644 - 650 and Class Notes

 

Oct. 24

Differential Amplifier with Active Load Cont.

Section 8.6; pp 657 - 665

HF Amplifier (week 2

Oct. 27

Stability and Root Locus (To Be Updated)

(Laplace Transform Review if needed)

Sections 10.1, 10.2, 10.10 and 10.11; pp 803 - 808; pp 809 - 814, pp 868 - 869, 870 - 879

 

Oct. 29

Stability and Gain/Phase Margins (To Be Updated)

Sections 10.12; pp 879 - 880, pp 880 - 883

 

Oct. 31

Gain/Phase Margins Cont. (To Be Updated)

Section 10.12; pp 879 - 880, pp 880 - 883

Differential Amplifier(week 1

CA3046

Nov. 03

Compensation (To Be Updated)

Section 10.13; pp 884 - 890

 

Nov. 05

Class A Amplifier (To Be Updated)

Section 11.1, 11.2; pp. 911 - 913, 913 - 918

 

Nov. 07

Class A Amplifier cont. (To Be Updated)

Section 11.1, 11.2; pp. 911 - 913, 913 - 918

Differential Amplifier(week 2

CA3046

Nov. 10

Class B Amplifier (To Be Updated)

Section 11.3; pp 918 - 924

 

Nov. 12

Class B Amplifier cont. (To Be Updated)

Section 11.3; pp 918 - 924

 

Nov. 14 Class AB Amplifier (To Be Updated) Section 11.4; 924 - 933 and Class Notes Mini-Project(week 1

CA3046

THAT340


THAT300-series SPICE models

Nov. 17 Class AB Amplifier cont. (To Be Updated) Section 11.4; 924 - 933 and Class Notes
Nov. 19 MID-TERM EXAM 1I (TENTATIVE)

MT2 Practice Problems NEW

Exam coverage: all class and text materials for HF model and its use, differenttial amplifiers and stability(root locus, GM/PM and frequencycompensation).

Nov. 21

Class AB Amplifier cont. (To Be Updated)

Section 11.4; 924 - 933 and Class Notes

Mini-Project/ week 2

CA3046


THAT340


THAT300-series SPICE models

Nov. 24

Introduction to Filters. (To Be Updated)

Sections 16.1, 16.2 and 16.3; pp 1255 - 1260, pp 1260 - 1263, pp 1263 - 1270

 

Nov. 26

NO CLASS

 

Nov. 28

THANKSGIVING BREAK

No Class Nov. 29. and No Labs Nov. 28 & 29

NO LABS THIS WEEK

Dec. 01

Introduction to Filters. Cont. (To Be Updated)

Sections 16.1, 16.2 and 16.3; pp 1255 - 1260, pp 1260 - 1263, pp 1263 - 1270

 

Dec. 03

Introduction to Filters Cont. (To Be Updated)

Sections 16.1, 16.2 and 16.3; pp 1255 - 1260, pp 1260 - 1263, pp 1263 - 1270

 

Dec. 05

Introduction to Filters Cont. (To Be Updated)

Sections 16.1, 16.2 and 16.3; pp 1255 - 1260, pp 1260 - 1263, pp 1263 - 1270

Mini-Project(week 3

CA3046

THAT340


THAT300-series SPICE models

Dec. 12, Fri.

Mini-Project Lab Report Due 
by 4:00 PM.
Submit to TA by e-mail attachment.

 

Date TBD

FINAL EXAM 

Room and Time TBD

 Exam coverage: TBD

SPECIAL OFFICE HOURS: Matt Hongjie Zhu; TBD: 307 Moore.

SPECIAL OFFICE HOURS: Dr. Laker; TBD; Room 203 Moore.

 


 

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2013 Exams

 16 Oct. 2013 MT1 Exam (solutions will be posted on ESE 319 Canvas site)

20 Nov. 2013 MT2 Exam (solutions will be posted on ESE 319 Canvas site)

 16 Dec. 2013 Final Exam (solutions will be posted on ESE319 Canvas site)

Policies

Grading Policy

Homework:                    10 %

2 Midterm Exams:           15 % each

Final Exam:                   30 %

Lab:                              30 %

Homework Policy: Homework assignments will comprised of textbook problems and instructor designed exercises

 ·       Homework assigned by Friday of each week.

·       Assignments due on Wednesday, the week after they are assigned.

·       Up to 2 late turn-ins (one-week, i.e. by the following Wednesday or one-week after the original due date) permitted with no penalty.

·       All homework not turned in on-time, according to the above, will receive "0" grade.

·       Graded homework returned by Monday or 5 days after they are turned in.

·       Copying or plagiarism of homework is a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity and can result in a “0” grade for the course.

·       Students are expected to manage their two allowed late turn-ins to allow for unforeseen situations that will result in homework to be turned in late.

Lab Policy

·       Each lab session lasts 3 hours and starts promptly.

Lab sessions missed due to legitimate absences must be made up.

·      Student Groups: The standard lab group is 2 students.

Pre-lab and Lab Notebook - individual.

Lab Report - group.

·       Collaboration is OK, copying and plagiarism is NOT OK.

Any violation of the Code of Academic Integrity may result in zero grade for the course.

§       Copying of pre-lab, data or report content from other lab groups.

§       Submitting contrived or altered data.

§       Copying material (other then schematics) from lab handouts or other sources into Lab Reports.

·       Individual Pre-Lab Preparation is very important.

Read lab assignment in advance.

Read text sections relevant to the experiment.

Do all pre-lab work assigned prior to the lab.  Pre-Lab work will be spot checked in lab.

Pencil and paper circuit design.

Mutisim circuit simulation(s).

·       Individual Lab Notebook for recording experimental data and observations is essential to preparing accurate Lab Reports.

Lab Notebooks will be kept as in ESE 206.

Lab Notebooks will be spot checked in lab and collected for instructor review at the end of the course.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lab Report Guidelines (Sample Lab Report)

·       GROUP LAB REPORT GUIDELINES (Reports due at start of next lab) UPDATED 22Sep08

·       READABILITY

Lab reports are to be clearly written and typed up.

Schematics may be computer drawn or neatly hand-drawn or copied/printed and pasted from circuit simulator created graphics.

Tables and graphs of measured data may be copied/printed and pasted from spreadsheet or some other math software.

§       Please label your graphs concisely and appropriately. Labeling your graphs will REDUCE the amount of work you have to do explaining the graph and allow you to concentrate on the results.

·       REQUIRED CONTENT

Heading: Date, Title of Experiment, Authors Names and Lab Section.

Introduction: A paragraph describing the experiment objectives. (5% of report grade or 1/20 points)

§       Example: In this lab, a high frequency amplifier was designed and then built on a proto-board. The experimental results from the amplifier were verified using Multi-Sim. This lab report discusses the findings from these experiments.

Theory: Ideal circuit behavior, pencil-and-paper design, Pre-lab calculations and answers, all relevant equations and pre-lab Multiim simulations (also conclusions drawn from the simulations). (20 % of report grade or 4/20 points)

§       This could include circuit equations for an op amp or Volterra series expansion for an oscillator (look it up).

Experimental Setup: Descriptions/schematics of actual circuit(s) tested, instrumentation used and setups for each test, the actual values of all components used. Its a good idea to take a photo (using a cell phone camera is sufficient) of your proto-board to illustrate your experimental circuitry layout(s). Please include a table of actual vs. "theoretical" or "ideal" values for components that require measurement. (15 % of report grade or 3/20 points)

§       This section can also include a picture (cell phone camera) of your experimental setup (with appropriate labels).

Experimental Data: Present experimental results (tables, diagrams, graphs, as appropriate).  This includes experimental and post experimental simulations using Multisim.. (25 % of report grade or 5/20 points)

§       If you refer back to your experimental data in some depth, you will want to label the plots with tags around the important areas of interest to assist in your presentation of data results.

§       Note: Do not analyze data here, that is for the Discussion Section.

Discussion: Discuss results and explain the inconsistencies between design assumptions, experimental results and post experiment simulation results.  This is where you tie together all of what you have written in the above sections.  The Theory, Set-Up, and especially the results sections are analyzed here in depth to show that you have come to understand the underlying issues associated with the lab experiments completed. Please include areas of improvement for accuracy and reliability and relate any interesting or odd observations during the experiment.(35 % of report grade or 7/20 points)

LAB REPORT GRADE: N points out of 20 points, where N less-than-or-equal to 20.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

§       Most discussion sections should begin with a table of values. This succinct table shows the experimental, theoretical (calculated from equations) and simulated (Multisim) results for parameters/variables of interest in the lab. This is typically a good jumping off point for the results analysis.

SUGGESTED: Individual Lab Notebooks for recording experimental data and observations are extremely helpful for preparing Lab Reports. Often as you take data, you will be unable to determine what will be the more important data for the lab Report. Keeping good notes will help this process greatly.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

·       OVERVIEW

In order of importance the sections are

§       Discussion

§       Having a fun weekend :-)

§       All the other sections.

VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: The Discussion section is where everything comes together - so if your other sections are weak - your Discussion will be weak. Every section should be composed with the idea that it will be referred to in the Discussion. Even if the reference - the behavior being referenced is reported to be 'erratic' is unexplained.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

·       LAB REPORT TURN-IN PROTOCOL

All Lab Reports are due the next lab session (1 week).

All Lab Reports are to be either turned in a paper copies or electronically as PDF by e-mail to the TA (TBD).

Up to 2 excused late Turn-Ins will be permitted without penalty (one-week, i.e. one-week after the original due date).

Late Lab Reports are due 1 week after original deadline.

Lab Reports violating the above, will receive "0" grade.

Students are expected to manage their two allowed late HW turn-ins to allow for unforeseen situations that will result in homework to be turned in late.

Using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, material, or lab results or solutions  (in part or whole) is a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity and will result in a zero grade for the course.
 
 

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2014 Homework Assignments

·       Homework Assignment #1: Problem Set 1 due Wednesday, Sep. 10: S & S Text Problems S & S Text Problems 6.1, 6.2, 6.7, 6.15, 6.18

·       Homework Assignment #2: Problem Set 2 due Wednesday, Sep. 17: S & S Text Problems 6.22, 6.24, 6.28, D6.34, 6.35 a and c

·       Homework Assignment #3: Problem Set 3 due Wednesday, Sep. 24: S & S Text Problems 6.49, D6.56, 6.57, 6.87, D6.89

·       Homework Assignment #4: Problem Set 4 due Wednesday, Oct. 01: S & S Text Problems TBD

·       Homework Assignment #5: Problem Set 5 due Wednesday, Oct. 08: S & S Text Problems TBD

·       Homework Assignment #6Problem Set 6 due Wednesday, Oct. 22: S & S Text Problems TBD

·       Homework Assignment #7: Problem Set 7 due Wednesday, Oct. 29: S & S Text Problems TBD

·       Homework Assignment #8: Problem Set 8 due Wednesday, Nov. 05: S & S Text Problems TBD

·    Homework Assignment #9: Problem Set 9 due Wednesday, Nov. 12: S & S Text Problems TBD

·  Homework Assignment #10: Problem Set 10 due Wednesday, Dec. 03: S & S Text Problems TBD

    2014 Homework Solutions (All HW solutions will be posted on the ESE 319 Canvas Adendum site)

·    Canvas Course Website Adendum - ESE319 student users of this site must login using their PennKey and password._ Students interested in further information about using CANVAS are refered to the CANVAS resource website.

The posted HW solutions are located by sequencing through the following actions:

Click on the ESE319 link in the list of courses under the heading "My Courses".

Click on the "Course Documents" Tab in left margin to locate the "Homework Solutions" folder.

Click on the link_ "Homework Solutions" to locate the homeworks solutions download page.

Click on the desired homework solutions set to view its Adobe PDF file..


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Useful links

·       MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS text support website

·       "Moore's Law" - from Intel Technology & Research

·       International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors

ITRS 2007 Edition

ITRS 2008 Update

·       Microelectronic Systems News

·       "Eco-Smart Technology" - from Intel Technology

·       Comparison of Bipolar vs. CMOS

. MultiSim Tutorial


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Kenneth R. Laker<laker@seas.upenn.edu>


Created: August 13, 2007; Updated: September 16, 2014 (KRL)