Beth A. Winkelstein

Professor
Bioengineering (BE)

Email | Research Webpage

Honors and Awards:  First Place Cervical Spine Research Society Basic Science Research Award Paper - 2013, Stapp Association Award for Second Place in Best Student Paper at the Stapp Car Crash Conference - 2013, University of Pennsylvania Ford Motor Company Award for Faculty Advising - 2013, Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering - 2013, Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - 2012, Editor of the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering - 2012 to present, Stapp Association Award for Second Place in Best Student Paper at the Stapp Car Crash Conference - 2011, Cervical Spine Research Society Twenty-First Century Grant Award - 2011, Cervical Spine Research Society First Place Basic Science Research Award Paper - 2010, Stapp Association Award for Best Student Paper at the Stapp Car Crash Conference - 2008, Stapp Association Award for Third Place Student Paper Award at the Stapp Car Crash Conference - 2007, ASME YC Fung Award - 2006, NSF CAREER Award - 2006, Ford Motor Company Award for Outstanding Faculty Advising - 2006

Research Expertise: Biomechanics | Neuroengineering | Orthopaedic Bioengineering

The broad goal of Beth's research is to understand the mechanisms of injury that produce whiplash, sports-related, and other painful injuries. By combining biomechanical and immunological techniques, her lab can define the relationships between injury to the cervical spine/neck and physiological cascades of persistent pain. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding injury to individual structures in the neck, such as the facet joints, nerve roots and spinal cord and how mechanical loading to these structures elicits pain. Through this work she can begin to develop thresholds for mechanical injury that produce persistent pain; and work towards a definition of the neck's tolerance for painful injury. Additional research efforts are aimed at understanding the role of biomechanics in the neuroimmunologic changes of the central nervous system that contribute to persistent pain. Applications of her current work are in the areas of automotive and whiplash-related injury and sports injuries and have implications for design efforts in automobiles that are aimed at preventing whiplash injuries.

Member of:

Affiliations:  Professor of Neurosurgery (SOM); Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education; Member, Neuroscience Graduate Group

Education:
PhD Biomedical Engineering 1999 - Duke University
BSE Bioengineering 1993 - University of Pennsylvania


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