Meet Our Students

Allison Pearce

Allison Pearce
College Station, Texas

Allison became attracted to engineering through a high school camp project to build a roller coaster using Popsicle sticks and a glue gun. At Penn, after dabbling in biology and bioengineering and then discovering a love of computer science, Pearce now sees a future as a software engineer. A love for problem solving lies at the heart of all her passions.

Learn more about Alison!

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Faculty Spotlight

Jan Van der Spiegel

Scott Diamond
Arthur E. Humphrey Professor
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Bioengineering

Winner of the 2008-09 Heilmeier award, Scott’s research involves gene therapy, blood systems biology and protease proteomics, microfluidics and biorheology, endothelial mechanobiology, and high throughput screening. The Diamond lab has pioneered the use of nonclassical nuclear localization sequences and cationic steroids for nonviral DNA delivery, printed chemical microarrays for high throughput screening, and stochastic simulation for blood systems biology. Scott is the founding director of the Penn Center for Molecular Discovery, a multi-disciplinary center designed to discover new biologically useful agents.

 

 

Majors

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) is a traditional engineering degree that prepares students for careers in professional engineering, computer science or digital media design. The first type of engineering degree to be offered at Penn, BSE degrees require 40 or 41 course units and are designed to be completed in four years.

Bioengineering
Interface the engineering sciences, biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine to advance human health and solve problems in medicine and the biological sciences.

The top-ranked Department of Bioengineering at Penn Engineering offers a fully-accredited degree program that brings together the creation of new knowledge and understanding of biological systems through engineering analysis and experimentation, with the application of engineering design and practice principles to solve problems in medicine and the biological sciences. Both the BSE and the BAS programs in Bioengineering are identical for the first two years, and students may easily change from one program to the other as their career plans become clearer.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Catherine Lawrence

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Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Use the basics of chemistry, biomolecular and engineering sciences to develop chemical and biological processes to change raw materials into useful ones.

The great flexibility and power offered by a degree in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Penn Engineering ensures that every student receives thorough training in fundamental concepts of permanent relevance and the physical, biotechnological, and chemical principles underlying the engineering profession.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Denice Gorte

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Computer Engineering

The enormous computational capabilities of modern computer technology offer the potential to create new applications and value that can be turned into concrete artifacts and services that improve our lives and create wealth.

Computer Engineering is the discipline that designs and engineers computer systems from digital circuits, through compilers and runtime systems, to networking and world-wide distributed systems. As an engineering discipline, the computer engineer must appreciate the physical aspects of computations (energy, delay, area, reliability, costs) and be able to expertly navigate the multidimensional trade-off space associated with implementing computations.

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Computer Science
Utilize, analyze and create information processing systems for whatever career, advanced education, or personal interests you choose to pursue.

A degree in computer science provides students with an in-depth education in the conceptual foundations of computer science and in complex software and hardware systems. It allows them to explore the connections between computer science and a variety of other disciplines in engineering and outside. Combined with a strong education in mathematics, sciences, and the liberal arts it prepares students to be leaders in computer science practice, applications to other disciplines, and research.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Jackie Caliman

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Digital Media Design

The Digital Media Design (DMD) program is an interdisciplinary major in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Penn. As a full-fledged Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) degree, it combines major coursework in computer graphics within the Computer and Information Science department, Communication theory courses from the Annenberg School and Fine Arts courses from Penn's School of Design. The program was designed for students who have an interest in computer graphics, animation, games, and the design of virtual reality environments and interactive technologies.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Amy Calhoun

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Electrical Engineering
Develop new technologies that acquire, transmit, store and process information as electrical and optical signals to work in modern day technological advances and products.

The Electrical Engineering major at Penn Engineering ranges across telephony, mobile and satellite communications, fiber optics, electrical power and machinery, instrumentation, computer systems, satellite systems, microelectronics, robotics, graphics, automatic control, and telecommunications. The program is a flexible, broad-based major that provides a rigorous grounding in the analytical and experimental foundations of electrical engineering while allowing a student substantial flexibility in crafting an individualized program reflecting his or her interests and career goals.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Lilian Wu

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Materials Science and Engineering
Use chemistry, physics and biological principles to create and manipulate the structural and functional properties of advanced materials to pave the way for new fields, new ideas, and new technologies that are changing the way we live and work.

The Materials Science and Engineering program reflects the recent explosive growth of interest in the nano and bio sectors of engineering science and technology. The rapid progress of modern technology continues to be driven by advances in our understanding of the science of the materials which underpin these technologies. An education at Penn Engineering in the field of materials science will provide the foundation for a leadership role in a career pathway in any of the many areas of current technology.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Vicky Lee

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Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
Study forces, deformations and motions of solid bodies and fluids, and heat generation and transport to understand and design components and systems for a wide range of applications – from rocket engines and nano motors to toasters and power tools.

The program in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics is a broad-based education that will allow you to adapt to changes in technology in our rapidly changing society.  At the same time, the curriculum offers the flexibility for you to specialize in one or more areas in mechanical engineering (for example, energy engineering, mechanical design, fluid mechanics, or structure mechanics) or even such cross disciplinary areas such as robotics, biomechanics, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), or mechanics of materials.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Desirae Cesar

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Networked & Social Systems Engineering
The Rajendra and Neera Singh Program in Networked & Social Systems Engineering (NETS), formerly known as Market and Social Systems Engineering (MKSE), is the world's first course of study to fully integrate the disciplines needed to design and analyze the complex networks that are reshaping our society.

This program prepares students to shape the technologies that underpin Internet-based search and electronic commerce, financial networks, social networks, and even such exchanges as the power grid. Graduates of this program will be prepared to engineer networks that work for both end-users and investors. Other graduates may become the policy-makers who are urgently needed to regulate these networks for the protection of commercial property and societal good.

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Systems Science and Engineering
Design and implement systems that ensure effective operation of technological systems for applications such as computers, environmental organizations, manufacturing, logistics, transportation, information and telecommunications, economic and financial organizations, health care, and military defense.

The Systems Science and Engineering (SSE) program specializes in those aspects of engineering that pertain to effectiveness of whole systems. In contrast to other engineering specialties which are grounded in certain aspects of science, system engineering is grounded primarily in mathematics and methodology. The core curriculum focuses on mathematical modeling and simulation, rather than on particular physical sciences. To assure that designs are responsive to real needs, students learn how to model, simulate, optimize, integrate and evaluate systems.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Lilian Wu

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Bachelor of Applied Science

The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) is a degree option that offers students breadth and allows them to combine a technology-based degree with considerable course work in the liberal arts, communications, or fine arts. This degree is designed primarily for students whose interests are not oriented toward a professional engineering career. It is a popular degree option for those preparing for careers in medicine, business, and law. The BAS degree requires a minimum of 40 course units.

Biomedical Science
Interface the engineering sciences, biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine to advance human health and solve problems in medicine and the biological sciences.

The Bachelor of Applied Science degree offers students breadth and flexibility and allows them to combine a technology-based degree with considerable course work in the liberal arts, communications, business or fine arts. It is designed primarily for students whose interests are not oriented toward a professional engineering career. It is a popular degree option for those preparing for careers in medicine, business, and law. Many students who are pursuing dual degree programs opt for this degree. The BSE and the BAS programs in bioengineering are identical for the first two years, and students may easily change from one program to the other as their career plans become clearer.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Catherine Lawrence

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Computer and Cognitive Science
Study the mind and behavior using the engineering discipline of computer science and incorporating the areas of neuroscience, linguistics, psychology, philosophy, sociology and biology, just to name a few.

Cognitive science is a science of mental information processing that requires collaborative research in several disciplines. In the cognitive science program at Penn Engineering, the opportunity exists for studying a diversity of subjects which satisfy personal desires, developing a broad foundation for adapting to new societal demands, and maintaining flexibility for moving into new areas of interest if a change in personal career direction develops.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Jackie Caliman

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Computational Biology
Intertwine the disciplines of computer science, biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics to study biological systems and address problems inspired by biology.

A BAS in Computational Biology requires that students augment a basic computer science curriculum with courses in biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics. This program has a year-long capstone course in computational biology that is co-taught by faculty in computer science, biology and genetics.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Jackie Caliman

Learn more about the program.

Computer Science
Utilize, analyze and create information processing systems for whatever career, advanced education, or personal interests you choose to pursue.

A degree in computer science provides students with an in-depth education in the conceptual foundations of computer science and in complex software and hardware systems. It allows them to explore the connections between computer science and a variety of other disciplines in engineering and outside. A BAS in computer science combines knowledge of technology with an understanding of human and social values, and is designed for students who do not plan to work as professional engineers, and want a customized education which combines the liberal arts and technology in a manner unique to their career goals.

Undergraduate Coordinator: Jackie Caliman

Learn more about the program.

Individualized
An additional option is the BAS "Individualized" major which is declared with an approved individualized title. The title may not contain the word "engineering" and should avoid any possible confusion with a named BSE program name. Students must apply for the "Individualized" major, in accordance with the following parameters:

1. Must possess a minimum of 3.3 cumulative GPA to apply;

2. Must complete requirements of the first two years of a BSE or named BAS program curriculum, specifically, the first two years of the Math, Science, and Engineering requirements.

3. Must have a Faculty Mentor (Advisor) in SEAS as sponsor of application, indicating his/her willingness to serve as Advisor for the student's work in an Individualized major;

4. Must complete an "Application for the Individualized Major" which will be reviewed by the Petition for Action Committee. The Petition must be signed by the sponsoring Faculty Advisor as well as that faculty member's Undergraduate Chair.

5. The earliest time to apply is spring of sophomore year, for junior year entry.

Career Goal Statement:

Every student in an individualized BAS degree program must write a one-page narrative that describes his or her career goals and the role that the engineering component of the plan will play in preparation for that career. This narrative must be submitted with the application for the Individualized Major. The career goal statement should be accompanied by a BAS CPG which has been approved and signed by the academic advisor. The course plan may be amended at any time by submitting a revised CPG.

Additional Options

Dual Degrees and Special Programs: You may combine your BAS or BSE degree with a second degree in one of Penn's other undergraduate schools. A Dual Degree is not to be confused with a "dual major" (see below) where a student earns two degrees within Penn Engineering. Learn more.

Dual Majors within Penn Engineering: A student who is interested in two engineering majors   may be permitted to expand his/her program in order to earn a degree in both majors. In such cases, the student must satisfy the degree requirements for both BSE curricula. (BAS students are not permitted to dual major within engineering.) To achieve dual engineering major status, a student must prepare Course Planning Guides at Penn InTouch for the two curricula showing how the requirements for each will be satisfied. Learn more.

Second Major in the College of Arts and Sciences: Some SEAS students may wish to consider a second major in the College of Arts and Sciences as an alternative to a dual degree. All College majors are open to engineering students (both BSE and BAS) as a second major. It is important to note that this program results in a single degree (from SEAS) with two majors, one in SEAS and one in SAS. Students interested in pursuing a second major in the College should contact directly the Department that offers the major.